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Watch on Cineuropa : Un monde meilleur - Des films qui promeuvent la diversité, la migration et les nouvelles manières d’être au monde

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- De nouveaux joyaux indé à découvrir dans nos pages : attachez vos ceintures et rejoignez-nous dans ces voyages cinématographiques !

Watch on Cineuropa : Un monde meilleur - Des films qui promeuvent la diversité, la migration et les nouvelles manières d’être au monde
Une saison en France de Mahamat-Saleh Haroun

Cet article est disponible en anglais.

All around the world, millions of people live in transit. Whether fleeing violence to build a better life abroad, or struggling to find new purpose and meaning in this one, travelling is a fundamental facet of our existence, and one that cinema has explored since its inception. In a sea of films that have chronicled all sorts of journeys - geographical and psychological - we have selected a few guaranteed to make you travel from the comforts of home. Hailing from all corners of the world, here's some of our favourite cinematic voyages.

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These titles are brought to you in partnership with eyelet (read the news), a streaming platform designed to give cinephiles around the world access to the very best in independent cinema. In conjunction with eyelet, we are now able to showcase films we’ve been reviewing over the years - titles you can stream and read about on Cineuropa. Stay tuned for the new movies coming your way soon!

On the Milky Road [+lire aussi :
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– Emir Kusturica

Two-time Palm d’Or winner Emir Kusturica directs and stars as a milkman, whose life in the war zone of the 90s Bosnian conflict is turned upside down by a love affair with a mysterious Italian fugitive (Monica Bellucci). An impressive tale of forbidden love thrumming with the director’s distinct blend of energy and dark humour.

Los Exoticos – Michael Ramos Araizaga

What exactly are the exoticos? Michael Ramos Araizaga’s documentary sheds light on the life and history of Mexico’s most flamboyant and best-groomed wrestlers. A subtle look at these mannered gladiators and their fans, which doubles as a critique of society’s stances toward homosexuality.

The We and the I [+lire aussi :
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– Michel Gondry

An extremely original and heartfelt film by Michel Gondry (famed for helming Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), The We and the I homes in on a group of teenagers bracing for their last day of high school, conjuring an indelible portrait of what it feels like to wrestle with the desire to be yourself, and the need to blend in.

Vote for Kibera [+lire aussi :
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– Martin Páv

Martin Páv’s documentary beckons us into the heart of Kibera, a giant slum in the outskirts of Nairobi captured here through a mosaic of interviews with local residents and artists. A piercing portrait that refuses to succumb to hopelessness and misery, and conjures instead an uplifting and engrossing ode to the slum’s resilient and resourceful folks.

Beasts of the Southern Wild – Benh Zeitlin

Behn Zeitlin stunned Sundance with this Malick-inspired look at the Hurricane Katrina catastrophe, as experienced by a six-year-old girl and her father. A work of unbridled ambition and compassion, guaranteed to make your jaw drop, and your heart melt.

Look at Me [+lire aussi :
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– Néjib Belkadhi

After his wife suffers a stroke, Tunisian-born, Marseille-based Lotfi must return to his native land and reunite with his estranged and autistic son. A harrowing, thoughtful and unflinching tale about finding a place in the world.

A Season in France [+lire aussi :
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– Mahamat-Saleh Haroun

A Central African Republic teacher flees his native land for France, where he falls for a local woman, and struggles to build a new life in the foreign turf. A brutal look at the refugee experience and the humiliations suffered by anyone forced to go through Europe’s asylum system. An unmissable and deeply compassionate gem.

Border [+lire aussi :
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– Ali Abbasi

Customs officer Tina has an incredible sense of smell, but when the mysterious Vore walks past her, her super talent is challenged for the first time ever. Winner of Cannes’ Un Certain Regard award in 2018, Border is unlike anything you’ve ever seen, an odd tale of belonging and Frankenstein-like romance with a surprisingly large heart.

The Farewell – Lulu Wang

Chinese-American Billi (Awkwafina, awarded a Golden Globe for her turn) travels back to China to visit her grandmother. The old matriarch is dying, but the family has agreed to keep the news secret from her, and to hastily arrange a wedding that shall serve as a final goodbye. One of the greatest surprises of the past few years, The Farewell paints a family portrait that’s both culturally specific and rooted in timeless, universal themes.

Too Late to Die Young [+lire aussi :
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– Dominga Sotomayor

A heartrending coming of age set in a rural commune nearby Santiago in 1990s Chile, Too Late to Die Young is as much an elegy to teenage angst and freedom as it is a portrait of a country venturing into adulthood, captured in the midst of its post-Pinochet transition. If the name of Chilean prodigy and writer-director Doming Sotomayor has escaped your radars, jot it down at once, and if you’re yet to watch this gem for which she won the Best Director award in 2018, here’s your chance to make amends.

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(Traduit de l'anglais)

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